Listing Divorced Hosts on your Wedding Invitations

You’re planning your big day, and now the time has come to plan your wording for your wedding invitation.  Coming from a ‘broken home’, (I hate that term), can be difficult when listing your hosts on your wedding invitation, and believe it or not, there is actually a right and wrong way to list your […]

You’re planning your big day, and now the time has come to plan your wording for your wedding invitation.  Coming from a ‘broken home’, (I hate that term), can be difficult when listing your hosts on your wedding invitation, and believe it or not, there is actually a right and wrong way to list your hosts when they are divorced, if you are using proper and traditional wedding etiquette.  Something as simple as the word “and” signifies marriage on your invitations…and if you’re not careful, it can look like your father who is remarried to your step-mom is also still married to your mother!  Oh, wouldn’t that be quite interesting?!

The whole meaning behind wording your wedding invitation is to convey your information in a clear and concise manner.  When listing your parents as hosts for your wedding, remember that the man should never be separated from his surname, (last name).

If your parents are married, it should be listed as…

Mr. and Mrs. Smith
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter

If your parents are divorced, your parents should be listed on two different lines  and should NOT be connected by the word “and”.  Yes, I understand that logically you want the word “and” to be there, however it is not proper and the “and” will truly signify marriage.  Your mother’s name should be printed first, followed by your father’s name.

If your parents are divorced, it should be listed as…

Jennifer M. Lang
Michael S. Sutterfield
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter

If your parents have remarried, and all partners are hosting the wedding, you will list the names as couples, again on separate lines…

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Lang
Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Sutterfield
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter

Have an even more unique situation than outlined above? Trust me, there is always a right or wrong answer. Feel free to ask the etiquette experts at InvitationBox.com and we’ll be happy to inform you of the correct answer, or do the research for you if you stump us. No question is a stupid question when it comes to wording your perfect wedding invitation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge